Seasonal goods - how long do you have to wait for a workshop appointment

Is Saab becoming more and more of a seasonal product? A friend tried to get a workshop appointment for his Saab 9-3 Cabriolet a few days ago. He learned that an inspection at the authorized Saab Service would be possible in September at the earliest. A waiting period of 2 months - and not acceptable to him. He refused. An isolated case? Where are the alternatives and how do you plan your workshop appointments sensibly?

Workshop service
Wait a long time for an appointment when the Saab has to be serviced?

Of course, you can go to another workshop. There's one at my hangar around the corner. She does a lot of work that is not necessarily Saab specific. A few weeks ago I had a minor mishap with my 9-3 Aero. The front bumper had involuntary contact with the ground. The workshop around the corner fixed that quickly and cheaply. No waiting time, quick appointments, good work.

It wouldn't be a real alternative for my friend's 9-3 Cabriolet. Here the priorities are elsewhere. The Saab is a definite lover object. The Saab stamp in the checkbook counts a lot, which is really 100% Saab except for one entry. It should stay that way, actually.

The alternative would be to overturn the inspection, which does not really play a role given the low mileage. And then to wait patiently for the month of September until the authorized Saab workshop has time. About choosing a non-branded workshop. After all, oil changes go everywhere and specific material for inspection can often be brought with you on request.

Saab as seasonal goods

Another friend has been doing it for years with his Saab 9-5 OG. He orders everything that is needed for the inspection Skandix. Filters, seals, spark plugs, as the case may be. The independent workshop around the corner is allowed to deliver the engine oil and other fluids, as well as the work.

This is how he controls what is being built. Appointments are made on call, there are no waiting times. And both sides are satisfied.

I myself relocate my plannable workshop visits mainly to the cold season. Because Saab is becoming more and more seasonal. A development that is no longer reversible and that means that many workshops get too much work in the summer.

With the resulting long waiting times, while the winter half-year could often bring more orders.

Authorized Saab service or independent workshop?
Authorized Saab service or independent workshop?

Independent workshops or authorized Saab partners

What is the current situation with readers? Are long waiting times the exception in summer, or are they now the rule? And is the inspection and necessary maintenance work carried out by an authorized Saab partner, or do the majority trust independent workshops and screwdrivers with Saab experience?

Or is it the case that screwing is done on your own, the oil change and all work is done in the garage or carport at home and workshops are no longer so important? Vote and write your opinion!

Seasonal goods - are there long waiting times for a workshop appointment in summer?

  • No, that has never happened before (53% 245 Votes)
  • Yes, I've seen that before (47% 219 Votes)

Total Voters: 464

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Saab partner, independent workshop, screw it yourself

  • I primarily trust an authorized Saab (Orio) partner (52% 342 Votes)
  • A free workshop takes care of my Saab (36% 236 Votes)
  • I do almost everything myself on my Saab (8% 55 Votes)
  • A workshop chain (Bosch, ATU) takes care of it (4% 26 Votes)
  • A Saab is robust and does not need any maintenance (0% 2 Votes)

Total Voters: 661

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23 thoughts on "Seasonal goods - how long do you have to wait for a workshop appointment"

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    I don't know such a long wait at all.
    Smaller things are ALWAYS fixed immediately, if something really should be bigger,
    you will certainly not be able to avoid a certain waiting time. Thank god I've never seen this before!
    Oh yes, I always trust my SAAB workshop.

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    I'm still new to the SAAB drivers. But of course, when considering buying a SAAB, the workshop topic also played a role. The blog was a great help with this. Experience so far: lead time of two to four weeks. I have had that with the brand I have driven so far (Citroën). And the density of competent workshops there is not the best. In the SAAB area, I think it's lucky that the workshops - whether Orio partners or not - that still exist, work with dedication. You have to live on it. I see that very positively.

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    Hi Tom,

    My Saab partner in the south of Munich is busy. Nevertheless, I was able to make short-term appointments for our Saabs. I feel in good hands there. Man speaks Saab, and that for 40 years.

    I feel like your friend too. With one exception, my car was only at Saab Partner, and the stamp in the checkbook is important. If only for me.

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    I would be interested to know who goes to Opel in the workshop !?
    I have a very good one here, but I've been shy so far.

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      Here in southern Hesse, I am very satisfied with the Opel workshops and their expertise as a former Saab dealer. The employees drive the brand themselves.
      Inspection appointments are possible at short notice, the penultimate week was the annual inspection with the 9-3 convertible and a week later the repair of the air conditioning.
      It doesn't get any faster, although it was my first appointment there because I changed the workshop out of dissatisfaction with an overpriced spare part in the previous one.

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      The Opel workshops that are still screwing for Saab today cannot be compared with the workshops that “had to” screw Saab in GM times. There is a large Opel dealer near me who regularly has Saab in the yard and has a certain amount of expertise in the “younger” cars. If it's not about a classic, there is little to be said against trying out the Opel workshop. There seems to be a good feeling.

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        I have now decided to take a longer route and went back to Mr. Timmler's Saab service in Neumünster. Simply a very personable point of contact.

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    For more than 30 years I have been going to the same workshop, father and son, they know my SAAB - had more than 30 SAABs from the 12-99-9er in the more than 5 years. Currently still 9000ers in daily use. This garage knows all of my cars by heart, most of the time the diagnosis of defects was made over the phone.

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    I have had an excellent relationship with my workshop for over 20 years. GF and customer service managers still drive Saab and thus show their brand affinity as a former Saab dealership. I usually do planned work such as KD or HU with a lead time of around 2 weeks and get my desired date without any problems. And even with defects, I was always helped promptly.

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      Same with me too. My “3 Musketeers + D'Artagnan (9.5 NG, Transatlantic)” are at Kay Greenfield (https://www.autofit-greenfield.de), former SAAB contract partner, in good hands. If it takes longer, there is a “rental car”, always SAAB, for this time.

      Answer
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    What I ask myself is whether we still have a perspective with our cars !? Even or especially as seasonal vehicles. Actually, my convertible should get a new top. Which I wanted to have done in the next year as well. The current one is tight, but just used up and with quirks. Now I'm thinking if that makes any sense at all, or if I just drive it on and then let it be ?!
    I'm torn!

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      The market decides on the perspective. One can only say that the workshops are full and the still active dealers could have sold many more used Saab than were available in the spring. For the first time since the blog came up. Not only a German phenomenon as well. Lizis Garage also diligently delivers cars to CH, A, and D and also to workshops. Unfortunately there aren't enough good cars.

      Answer
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      My 901 convertible (seasonal vehicle) has a complete overhaul of the leather seats in a car upholstery near us in winter 2019/2020 ( https://autosattlerei-janzen.de ), and this spring a new roof at the same saddlery. Registered early enough, it went smoothly in the first week of April. The interior set up took longer, and I went “black” out and back in the morning hours of a weekend. It went well, no patrol at this time that stopped me because of the seasonal license plate.

      Answer
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    I find it interesting that the (specialist) workshops are so fully booked! I had to wait 2 months now, but here is the reason that other brands were included in order to survive, which I can understand.

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    Please, please have more comments, opinions, experiences ...

    I myself was torn in all directions.
    My Saab (9-3 I & 9-5 SC) were each forced to go on vacation at Opel in DK or in D.
    I was helped. Otherwise always at Saab. Now I think about alternatives and also about my own work.

    The former near me are doing too well. What used to be a good but expensive service feels more and more like a grace that you get after waiting. That pushes me on the Saab spirit. I do not like that.

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    Free workshop, formerly Saab and Opel. Buys from Opel (compatible parts much cheaper than Orio) and Skandix, no longer Orio because, according to the statement, too slow with delivery, expensive and much no longer available.

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      My workshop foreman also always fetches Opel parts. The previously hated GM relationship is now paying off. Identical parts are not always that bad.

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    It depends on. As a regular customer, I always get an appointment quickly at my workshop. But I've also seen that “occasional customers” have to wait a long time. Sure, those who have been driving Saab for years are preferred, that's conclusive for me.

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      In the greater Vienna area, everything is concentrated in one workshop and here in Vienna there are allegedly 2000 Saab vehicles in stock. In this one workshop there is concentrated Saab competence and almost every Saab problem can be solved.
      And now the drawback: because everyone comes who wants to know their Saab is in good hands, the capacity has now been exceeded, this also applies to premium customers. A good idea is to move work into winter for sure. Only everyone who drives young timers knows that you cannot choose when to break down and that these problems occur with car enthusiasts in summer when they are driven.

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        A situation that is comparable to that in Frankfurt. Competence is required.

        The winter idea is of course not a cure, but it may straighten out the situation in the workshops. Of course, it only applies to work that can be planned; there are always emergencies that must have priority.

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          I also live in Frankfurt and the situation with my Saabs is such that the youngest in the trio (built in 2009) gets an annual inspection and rarely has to go to the workshop out of turn.

          The other two (Bj. 1999 and Bj. 2001) each had “project characters” when they were with me and not planned as a daily driver, so this could be accommodated flexibly and also put in the winter / spring with the seasonal vehicle.

          For all unplanned incidents and emergencies, there is usually always a quick solution (this may be due to the long-term customer relationship as with other readers) and for everyone there is a “consultation hour” on Saturday morning, which you can come to without an appointment.

          Not a bad service, in my opinion ... they also specialize in Saab.

          Always have a good trip 🙂

          Answer
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      My workshop almost always has 2 to 4 weeks lead time - in summer and winter. I've got used to it by now. Performance counts and in this case it fits.

      Answer

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